For what it’s worth – now is the time

Things that matter

At the risk of being ignored, unfriended or scoffed at loudly by some, right now is the time to speak up. I’ve never hesitated to comment about things that are meaningful to me. I’m relatively unafraid (or just stupid as some have said) – after all, I’ve jumped out of an airplane 22 times (BTW, I don’t do that anymore).

Now is the time to speak, to voice feelings and concerns, and speak up against injustice. Not tomorrow or the next day or next year. Time is short; life is short.

And a couple of related observations. It’s easy to get angry and write someone off in the heat of the moment when you disagree, but everyone deserves a chance to be heard. I regularly remind myself about forgiveness, mercy and compassion; I’m still working on this.

Second, everyone is dealing with something. Who doesn’t have problems or frustrations? Who doesn’t feel sad or unhappy from time to time? And it’s not about the “issue” itself. If something is significant to you, you won’t hear me say your concern is silly or unfounded or stupid. I may disagree with your point of view, but I’ll listen to what you have to say. Or I’ll be there in the moment with you, not saying anything. Words aren’t necessary. Frankly, sometimes words are overrated and emotions and sentiment rule the day.

It’s no coincidence that today a friend posted on Facebook: “Reminded today of how blessed I am.” Remember the things that matter.

Enjoy. For What It’s Worth, Buffalo Springfield, 1967.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Public speaking – it’s all about the audience

Aud speaking tips

 

You’ve been invited to speak at a meeting. This could be something internal (within your organization) or external (for example, you volunteer with a not-for-profit organization and you’ve agreed to talk to a group of potential donors on their behalf). Following up on a previous post, here are some observations on audiences to help you become a more effective presenter.

Who are the people listening – or not listening – to you? Why are they there?
The event has been scheduled, the invites/notices have gone out, and you are the presenter. What do you know about your audience?

Audience analysis involves identifying the audience and adapting your presentation to them. This doesn’t mean “saying what they want to hear.” Audience adaptation should guide your content development and approaches to delivery.

Audiences can include reluctant attendees, indifferent visitors, agreeable supporters, and angry or fearful dissidents.

The “we have to be there” mindset.
For instance, I would contend that students in a public speaking class – and their motivation to listen to you – is somewhat mixed. (Hey, they’ve “got” to be there regularly, right? We refer to this as a “captive” audience.) In my experience, here are some of the reasons students are in class:

  • They want to get the information they need to do well on an upcoming test;
  • They hope the skills they learn will help in an upcoming job interview;
  • They want to get through the class to receive credit towards their degree and/or at least not get dropped from the course (if the teacher is recording student absences as outlined in the class syllabus they’ll meet the minimum attendance requirement);
  • They love learning.

The “who cares” listeners – uninterested or apathetic.
Perhaps a friend or significant other dragged these folks to your talk. Audience members are asking themselves “Why am I here?” Your biggest challenge will be getting people in this group to even listen.

The “we agree with you” point of view.
Most audience members share your opinions. As a collective group, your listeners relate to you, connect with you, and endorse your contentions and recommendations.

The “we don’t agree with you” and/or we’re angry or frustrated attendees.
What if audience members don’t concur with your main points? This is definitely a challenge if you’re trying to persuade. Can you establish “common ground” with listeners if they aren’t inclined to listen from the get-go? This – this – is why knowing about your audience is so important.

Here’s an example of a speaker at a recent community Town Hall, Congressman Joe Barton (R-TX) at an event in rural Frost, Texas. These Town Halls are set up as open forums for constituents to ask questions and hear from representatives. In this instance, Barton seemed to be unaware of the level of “resistance” he would encounter from audience members opposing his policy positions.

Listen to a portion of the presentation where Barton shouted back.

The bottom line.
Every audience is different. However, consider the potential “makeup” of attendees who have come to hear you speak before you arrive to speak. Tune in for the next post in this series on audience adaptation, some recommendations on ways to engage with your audience/s.

Goodbye 2015, hello 2016

HAPPY 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s about time to say so long to this year and look ahead, but not without a few observations and reflections on 2015.

  • The kindness (and patience) of friends old and new never ceases to amaze me.
  • I’m grateful for steady work as a freelancer with challenging work assignments.
  • Everyone faces challenges, every day – seen and unseen. Be compassionate.
  • Love all living creatures. Especially dogs.
  • Imagine a world without war or hatred. Consider what you can do to support this vision and turn it into reality. Pray.
  • Help others see the best in themselves. Encouragement doesn’t cost a thing.
  • Listen more and talk less.
  • Learning is a lifelong endeavor.

Here’s to a wonderful 2016!