For what it’s worth – now is the time

Things that matter

At the risk of being ignored, unfriended or scoffed at loudly by some, right now is the time to speak up. I’ve never hesitated to comment about things that are meaningful to me. I’m relatively unafraid (or just stupid as some have said) – after all, I’ve jumped out of an airplane 22 times (BTW, I don’t do that anymore).

Now is the time to speak, to voice feelings and concerns, and speak up against injustice. Not tomorrow or the next day or next year. Time is short; life is short.

And a couple of related observations. It’s easy to get angry and write someone off in the heat of the moment when you disagree, but everyone deserves a chance to be heard. I regularly remind myself about forgiveness, mercy and compassion; I’m still working on this.

Second, everyone is dealing with something. Who doesn’t have problems or frustrations? Who doesn’t feel sad or unhappy from time to time? And it’s not about the “issue” itself. If something is significant to you, you won’t hear me say your concern is silly or unfounded or stupid. I may disagree with your point of view, but I’ll listen to what you have to say. Or I’ll be there in the moment with you, not saying anything. Words aren’t necessary. Frankly, sometimes words are overrated and emotions and sentiment rule the day.

It’s no coincidence that today a friend posted on Facebook: “Reminded today of how blessed I am.” Remember the things that matter.

Enjoy. For What It’s Worth, Buffalo Springfield, 1967.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s realign “health care” with caring

healthcare_gov
As a health care marketing consultant with years of experience working in hospitals, and as someone who relies on the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) for my health insurance coverage, I’m very concerned about the “repeal and replace” promise made by the new incoming GOP administration.

Politics aside, it doesn’t make sense to “stop” an existing program without something else, especially when an estimated 20 million Americans are now covered.

The best way to foreclose the possibility of repealing Obamacare and failing to install a good replacement, then, would seem to be to hold off on repealing it until you’ve got that replacement.

The Washington Post covers this issue and “repeal and delay” points of view.

Statistically speaking, I’m only one in 20 million who will be impacted by changes in Obamacare. Personally, this matters to me. I’m guessing it matters to millions of others, too.